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How to Stop Using Drugs Today

If you’ve come to the decision that it’s time to quit drugs, then addiction has probably wreaked some havoc in your life. But even when you’re completely sure of your decision, getting rid of an addiction can still feel overwhelming. And part of the problem is that most people aren’t sure of how to stop using drugs, even if they truly want to.

If you live near Columbus, Ohio and you want to quit drugs today, then we’ve got the information that will help you get started. Keep reading for everything you need to know to stop drug addiction.

Why Is It So Hard to Quit Drugs?

how to quit an addiction

Often, the first time someone tries to stop using drugs is not their last attempt. In fact, between 40 and 60 percent of people who try to quit an addiction will relapse. While each case varies by individual, there are a variety of reasons that people relapse. To give you a better understanding of how to quit drugs successfully, let’s review the most common sources of relapse.

Drug Withdrawals

Without a doubt, drug withdrawals are major contributors to relapse. Depending on what you’re detoxing from, these symptoms can be uncomfortable and stressful, painful and life-threatening, or somewhere in the middle. But how, exactly, do drug withdrawals work?

When you use a drug for long periods of time, your body gets used to it. In fact, it may even change your brain chemistry to better accommodate for the drug that it expects to be there—this is also how your tolerance for a drug goes up over time. But when you decide that you want to stop drug addiction, your body doesn’t really get the memo. It continues to expect the drug, and without it, your body may not remember how to function normally anymore.


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Drug withdrawal symptoms depend largely upon your medical history, the length of time using, and the substance you’re addicted to. But some drug withdrawal symptoms include:

  • Nausea and vomiting
  • Anxiety
  • Delirium and hallucinations
  • Insomnia
  • Feelings of aggression
  • Uncontrollable shaking

As you can imagine, these symptoms can be terrifying when you’re going through them. And when you’re not sure how to stop using drugs, withdrawals can create an immediate, compelling reason to relapse before your sobriety has even truly begun.

Mental Health Issues

In the overwhelming majority of cases, people do not start doing drugs because they’re happy and their lives are going exactly how they want. More often, people self-medicate with drugs to deal with problems. Specifically, self-medication with drugs is often caused by an undiagnosed, untreated mental health condition.

Most often, people with co-occurring substance use disorders start with a mental health condition like depression, anxiety, bipolar disorder, or another mood disorder (although more severe issues like schizophrenia may also be present). Without the tools to understand where these negative feelings are coming from, they turn to drugs as a means to make themselves feel better. And it works—for a while.

But ultimately, drug addiction creates more problems than it solves. People start to find that they have more problems with friends and family, issues at work, and even legal troubles as a result of their substance abuse. But when they decide they want to learn how to stop using drugs, their mental illness symptoms can become even worse. In this way, co-occurring addiction and mental health problems create a vicious cycle that can be difficult to escape from.

Social Pressures

Something that people often underestimate in how to stop using drugs is the impact that the people around them can have. But when you live with a drug addiction, you start to surround yourself (sometimes accidentally) with people who also have drug and alcohol addictions. And when it comes time to get rid of your addiction, those people may not be as supportive as you hope.

Often, people who are still in an active addiction get defensive when someone around them decides to stop using drugs. They might assume that you think that you’re better than them, or that you might judge them for their lifestyles. This can create negative feelings for them, and often, the easiest way to deal with those feelings is to mock your decision to get sober.

And since humans are fundamentally social animals, that lack of support can hurt, especially when you’re just starting to learn how to stop using drugs.

How to Stop Using Drugs for Good

how to get rid of addiction

Clearly, there are many factors that can lead an individual to relapse or otherwise fail to quit drugs. But given that 75% of people with addiction will recover, there is clearly a way forward without drugs. So how do people get there?

The biggest factor in achieving long-term sobriety is professional support. Every cause of relapse above can be addressed with professional care. And in most cases, it’s easy to find a qualified drug rehab near you.

Drug withdrawals are the reason that most successful recoveries start with a medical drug detox. In this program, medical staff will work with you to understand what you’re detoxing from and to help you manage your symptoms. Not only does this keep you comfortable, but it removes the ability to call someone and buy more drugs, which can give you a stable, solid foundation for your recovery journey.

From there, most people will transition to a residential rehab program. Whereas detox tackles physical addiction, residential rehabilitation addresses the mental aspect. At The Woods at Parkside, programs are available both solely for addiction and for co-occurring disorders, meaning that everyone can get the help they need.

Throughout treatment, you will be surrounded by people who are going through the same process you are and learning how to stop using drugs. That means you’ll have a community by your side from detox to residential care to outpatient support, and that kind of social support can make all the difference in your journey to sobriety.

If you’re ready to quit drug addiction, then support is waiting for you. Call our friendly admissions specialists at 419-452-4818 or ask your questions online to learn about how we can help you get and stay sober.

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Please note: For medical emergencies, please call 911. For other urgent matters, please call our admissions line (419) 452-4818. Submissions after-hours, weekends, or holidays may experience a longer response time.

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